New Telephone Services For Businesses In New Hampshire

Acapella’s very own Matt Mercier joined Kevin Willet on “3 Questions With…” to talk about the cloud, softphones and the many features and advantages they’re bringing to small businesses.

Are You Still Using Obsolete Land Lines To Make Your Calls?

Acapella’s very own Matt Mercier joined Kevin Willet on “3 Questions With…” to talk about the cloud, softphones and the many features and advantages they’re bringing to small businesses.

When compared to what’s now available, using a traditional phone system isn’t just inefficient and illogical; it’s a sign that you could soon be obsolete. Isn’t it about time for you to update?

This is precisely what Acapella founder Matt Mercier discussed with Kevin Willet on “3 Questions With…”, exploring the benefits and limitations of the cloud, and related technology like softphones.

To start, Kevin posed a seemingly simple question – shouldn’t most of our business data be in the cloud at this point? After all, isn’t it safe to just put all your data in the cloud so you don’t have to worry about local data loss?

“Sure, putting things in the cloud is a great idea for redundancy’s sake, it’s less likely to get lost. It is accessible from other machines and your mobile devices, which is great,” says Matt. “There are means by which you can save locally and automatically save to the cloud, which is great. There’s no harm in putting stuff up there. The only challenge is if you don’t have access to the Internet for a while, you’ll have a hard time accessing it.”

Kevin went on to mention that he has known people who lost Internet connectivity when they needed access to their files, and couldn’t do anything to access them. That’s why a combination of local and cloud data storage seems to be the best call.

“An old friend of mine who works at Hewlett Packard likes to say, ‘Any data that doesn’t live in at least two places doesn’t exist’,” continued Matt. “The fact is that it’s susceptible to problems like this.”

The discussion then went on to talk about VoIP and a new telephone service that Acapella offers, also known as “softphones”. This new type of telephony gives small businesses “the big business feel”, as Kevin puts it in the interview.

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems place your calls through the cloud instead of a traditional phone line, granting you greater connectivity, more features, and reduced costs.

This allows users to limit and even eliminate their dependence on old telephone lines and use the high-speed dependability of an internet connection.

This technology offers a feature-rich user experience:

  • Softphones slash prices compared to traditional phone systems, allowing you to reallocate funds to other areas of your business that need attention.
  • Your connectivity and means of collaboration improve, allowing you to stay connected and in-the-loop even when you’re on the go.
  • A wide range of innovative features makes your communications easier and more effective, helping to increase productivity and improve your workflow.
  • So long as you have an Internet connection, your softphone system can be used on the go, whether you’re in your home, an office, a hotel room, or a café.
  • Your voicemail and faxes can be forwarded to your email inbox for optimal convenience.
  • Your softphone number can use any available area code, instead of the area code assigned to your region. This allows you to better reach out to those in other locations.

“It really levels the playing field, it’s a great new service, largely based on customer demand, that we’re offering,” says Matt. “Our prices are extraordinarily competitive, and our services are largely superior. Softphones work every bit as well as their traditional counterparts.”

“3 Questions With…”, hosted by Kevin Willett is produced by the New England B2B Network.

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